What’s Your Motive for Changing Teams?…. 3 More Essential Tips for Team Tryouts.

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Last week, I went over 3 key things to remember when transitioning to a new team or trying out for multiple prospective teams for the upcoming season. Click here to read last week’s post.  Here are 3 more things to consider to supplement the 3 points that were talked about last week.

1) “Wherever you go, you are taking yourself.”

-Many families try to run away from a team situation, unaware (or unwilling to admit) that THEY are the main culprits to their unhappy situation. Many feel they aren’t getting the playing time they deserve, that the coach is an imbecile, or that they don’t play enough tournaments. All of those complaints could (and many times are) just a figment of their own imagination and perspective. Be sure that before you leave one team to join another, that all complaints are first weighed with a logical and as unbiased opinion as possible.

 2.) Dad Coaches vs. Paid Coaches

-Nowadays, travel teams are exploring the option of paid coaches to run organizations as opposed to the traditional dad coaches who volunteer. There are pros and cons to each option.

Dad Coaches:

Pro- the most notable and most important pro that some parents will acknowledge about having a dad coach the team is that it tends to be significantly cheaper since they traditionally volunteer their coaching time. (Unless a team decides to use the money saved towards playing in more tournaments)

Con- There is always the chance of a dad coach practicing nepotism or what we all know as “daddy ball”

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Paid Coaches:

Pro-A great pro to having a paid coach is that they have usually played the game at a high level and are usually younger, so they tend to relate a little more to players. They can share personal stories of their time playing college or professional ball. Most importantly, they more than likely will not have a child on the team, which leaves room for a more fair competition amongst those fighting for playing time, etc.

Con-The most obvious con is the fact that playing for a paid coach will require a higher cost, but for many families who go this route, it’s well worth it. The instruction the players will receive coupled with the relief from the dreaded “daddy ball” life is enough for most parents to pay the extra cost.

(Editor’s Note: Overall this is true, but you really have to take it on a case by case basis.)

3.) Playing more games isn’t always better.

-It’s a myth that simply playing more games will make players better. Although it does contribute to more in-game experience (which never hurts), becoming a better player requires much more than simply standing on a baseball diamond for more innings than the next guy. Training and quality instruction, at all ages, is just as important (and sometimes more important) than just playing a ton of games. Of course game time allows for players to display what they’ve developed in training or practice, but many families make the mistake of choosing a team because they play more games, neglecting how much quality practice and instruction the team will get.

Check back next week for more essential tryout tips from guest blogger, Michael McCree. His book GameChanger: The Baseball Parent’s Ultimate Guidecan be found on Amazon.com.


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  Michael McCree, a former collegiate baseball player, has coached hundreds of youth     baseball players through private and team training and continues to have a widespread impact on players and parents alike. He currently coaches in Atlanta, Georgia and other surrounding areas. With a Master’s of Science degree in Sports Administration, his main focus in athletics is geared toward the development and achievement of youth athletes. His work is attributed to his strong belief that youth athletic involvement is an essential tool in the refinement of character.

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Angela Weight

Founder and publisher of Travel Ball Parents.com, Angela Weight is still a little shocked to be running one of the most popular youth sports parenting sites on the web. Click the ABOUT US tab to read her story.

19 thoughts on “What’s Your Motive for Changing Teams?…. 3 More Essential Tips for Team Tryouts.

  • July 26, 2016 at 3:23 pm
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    I have been coaching my kid team for a while now and for that say Daddy ball I may agree with you at some percentage. but myself I always push my my kid to the limit and I make it clear to him and the rest of the team that if they want that position they have to earn it period.

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  • August 28, 2015 at 6:12 pm
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    I’ve sat on the sidelines of different sports with both types of coaches, and I have to say ‘daddy’ coaches often fall into playing favoritism. And, the worst are the ones that give preference to their own kids and their friends.
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  • August 27, 2015 at 5:52 am
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    I have coached a few soccer teams for my son years ago. Needless to say the parents who are usually unhappy took not initiative to try and help either. When I coached I always asked other parents to help but they usually sat back and watched. I also tried to make sure the kids were having fun and taught them sportsmanship. Needless to say, there were a few unhappy parents. I chalked it up as it was them and nothing I did. It’s not like most coaches are paid anyhow.

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  • August 26, 2015 at 3:16 pm
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    Great information, thus far my son has only done martial arts. I imagine in the near future he will be interested in trying out other sports.

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  • August 26, 2015 at 2:01 pm
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    This post is very helpful for those who have kids in sports. Definitely will keep this in mind.

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  • August 26, 2015 at 1:10 pm
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    Great article. This is a good resource for families with kids who are into sports.

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  • August 26, 2015 at 11:10 am
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    Over here, the biggest problem woth coaches is that, they take Dad coaches which in turn favor their own family for opportunities even though they don’t play well. It is unfair for those who can really the game
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  • August 26, 2015 at 5:53 am
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    changing team is more challenging and fun. Its very important to keep the game fun and to learn new things

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  • August 25, 2015 at 10:35 pm
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    I think I prefer paid coaches. I have heard at times that dad coaches are often very biased and that can cause controversy.

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  • August 25, 2015 at 10:13 pm
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    My son-in-law had to coach 2 baseball teams for Dixie Youth this past summer. They just didn’t have enough volunteers. My oldest grandson has been asked to be on a travel team for the last couple of years, but it’s just too much at this time so he sticks to local teams. Great tips!
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  • August 25, 2015 at 9:02 pm
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    SO the latter disagree with the saying ‘practice makes perfect’? Or I must have taken it out of context. I guess I did. Yes, the quality of how you were taught does matter. 🙂

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  • August 25, 2015 at 8:55 pm
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    This is a really interesting article, I haven’t given any of this much thought before! My little ones just started t-ball this year, so nothing serious in there minds yet, but something to keep in mind!

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